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king-emare:

vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer

Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / / 3

As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]

©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved

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(via kenyatta)

20 notes

yahoonewsphotos:

Photos of the day - April 20, 2014

A child dressed as an angel during Holy Week in the small town of Tudela in Spain, a Pro-Russian militant walks past burnt cars near a checkpoint that was the scene of a gunfight overnight near the city of Slaviansk and a large crowd is seen in St. Peter’s Square from the Bernini colonnade during Pope Francis’ Easter Mass, at the the Vatican are some of the photos of the day. (AP/Reuters)

Find more news related pictures on our photo galleries page.

(via yahoonews)

45 notes

pewresearch:

People in 40 countries were surveyed last spring about eight topics and were asked whether they considered each morally acceptable, morally unacceptable, or not a moral issue. Europeans were consistently less likely to judge these things as unacceptable compared with Latin Americans, Asians, Africans and Middle Easterners.

pewresearch:

People in 40 countries were surveyed last spring about eight topics and were asked whether they considered each morally acceptable, morally unacceptable, or not a moral issue. Europeans were consistently less likely to judge these things as unacceptable compared with Latin Americans, Asians, Africans and Middle Easterners.